It’s party time!: We Speak in Storms review + a happy list + all around blog tour fun!!

IT’S ALIIIIIIIVE.

“It,” of course, being my blog.

I don’t know how y’all feel about my constant comings and goings here, with each coming containing a solemn vow that the goings have stopped, immediately followed by an utter lack of posts lasting weeks if not months…but I feel pretty good about it. Continue reading

Disney World, but dystopian (??!!): The Kingdom Review

EVIL DISNEY. EVIL ROBOT DISNEY. WITH MURDER, AND ALSO TECHNOLOGY.

EVIL ROBOT DISNEY OF THE FUTURE.

What more do I have to say?! I hope it’s not a lot, because that’s really all I got. This book was nonstop exciting and nonstop original and nonstop awesome and that’s really all I have to say. Continue reading

Books I like that no one else does (even my positive opinions are unpopular)

I hate a lot of books. 2.7 average rating for 2017, 2.97 average overall rating on Goodreads, bla bla bla, you’ve heard it before. In addition to that fact, there is also the fact that I read a lot of popular YA books. Probably mostly popular YA books.

So. In conclusion, I read a lot of well-loved YA and I hate a lot of what I read. Bring those things together and you’ve got the formula for consistently unpopular opinions boi!!

But there’s another side to the unpopular opinion, and that is “Here is a book that people aren’t all that into that I loved a lot.” It is, in short, the more fun side. And here are three times that it happened to me!!!

Continue reading

The world gives and the world taketh away: A review of a book I love and a book I…who even knows

Two allegedly middle grade fairytale-based fantasy novels. TWO VERY DIFFERENT REACTIONS FROM MOI.

So. Do you want the good news or the bad news first? Is it supposed to be bad news first? “Bad news” is kind of a misnomer, in this case. “Bad news” on the blog of the famed 2.7-average-rating-for-2017 hater of books everywhere, ruiner of dreams, crusher of souls can only qualify as, like, one of my all time favorite books garnering a one star rating upon reread?

Not that out of the question, though, really.

Continue reading

Scales & Scoundrels Review: Dragons + Beautiful Art + Girl Protagonist????

Synopsis: The new Image Comics series Scales & Scoundrels invites readers of all ages to join a group of treasure hunters and warriors as they venture into an ancient labyrinth. But what these characters don’t know if that they’re heading down a path that will take them far beyond that maze, putting the fate of the world in their hands. Written by Sebastian Girner with art by Galaad, Scales & Scoundrels follows Luvander, an orphan “treasure-hunter, adventure-seeker, [and] life-saver.” She’s looking to make a name for herself while getting rich in the process, and she assembles a group of like-minded individuals to brave The Dragon’s Maw with her.

Note: I received an advanced copy of this book from the illustrator in exchange for an honest review. This is no way impacted my thoughts.

Continue reading

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo Review

Synopsis: From Taylor Jenkins Reid comes an unforgettable and sweeping novel about one classic film actress’s relentless rise to the top—the risks she took, the loves she lost, and the long-held secrets the public could never imagine.

Evelyn Hugo is finally ready to tell the truth about her glamorous and scandalous life. But when she chooses unknown magazine reporter Monique Grant for the job, no one in the journalism community is more astounded than Monique herself. Why her? Why now?

Monique is not exactly on top of the world. Her husband, David, has left her, and her career has stagnated. Regardless of why Evelyn has chosen her to write her biography, Monique is determined to use this opportunity to jumpstart her career.

Summoned to Evelyn’s Upper East Side apartment, Monique listens as Evelyn unfurls her story: from making her way to Los Angeles in the 1950s to her decision to leave show business in the late 80s, and, of course, the seven husbands along the way. As Evelyn’s life unfolds through the decades—revealing a ruthless ambition, an unexpected friendship, and a great forbidden love—Monique begins to feel a very a real connection to the actress. But as Evelyn’s story catches up with the present, it becomes clear that her life intersects with Monique’s own in tragic and irreversible ways.

Filled with emotional insight and written with Reid’s signature talent, this is a fascinating journey through the splendor of Old Hollywood into the harsh realities of the present day as two women struggle with what it means—and what it takes—to face the truth.

Continue reading

Modern Romance Review: Forget everything else I’ve ever said, Aziz Ansari is my husband, for real, in real life

Synopsis: A hilarious, thoughtful, and in-depth exploration of the pleasures and perils of modern romance from one of this generation’s sharpest comedic voices

At some point, every one of us embarks on a journey to find love. We meet people, date, get into and out of relationships, all with the hope of finding someone with whom we share a deep connection. This seems standard now, but it’s wildly different from what people did even just decades ago. Single people today have more romantic options than at any point in human history. With technology, our abilities to connect with and sort through these options are staggering. So why are so many people frustrated?

Some of our problems are unique to our time. “Why did this guy just text me an emoji of a pizza?” “Should I go out with this girl even though she listed Combos as one of her favorite snack foods? Combos?!” “My girlfriend just got a message from some dude named Nathan. Who’s Nathan? Did he just send her a photo of his penis? Should I check just to be sure?”

But the transformation of our romantic lives can’t be explained by technology alone. In a short period of time, the whole culture of finding love has changed dramatically. A few decades ago, people would find a decent person who lived in their neighborhood. Their families would meet and, after deciding neither party seemed like a murderer, they would get married and soon have a kid, all by the time they were twenty-four. Today, people marry later than ever and spend years of their lives on a quest to find the perfect person, a soul mate.

For years, Aziz Ansari has been aiming his comic insight at modern romance, but for Modern Romance, the book, he decided he needed to take things to another level. He teamed up with NYU sociologist Eric Klinenberg and designed a massive research project, including hundreds of interviews and focus groups conducted everywhere from Tokyo to Buenos Aires to Wichita. They analyzed behavioral data and surveys and created their own online research forum on Reddit, which drew thousands of messages. They enlisted the world’s leading social scientists, including Andrew Cherlin, Eli Finkel, Helen Fisher, Sheena Iyengar, Barry Schwartz, Sherry Turkle, and Robb Willer. The result is unlike any social science or humor book we’ve seen before.

In Modern Romance, Ansari combines his irreverent humor with cutting-edge social science to give us an unforgettable tour of our new romantic world.

Continue reading

The Raven Boys Review

Synopsis: “There are only two reasons a non-seer would see a spirit on St. Mark’s Eve,” Neeve said. “Either you’re his true love . . . or you killed him.”

It is freezing in the churchyard, even before the dead arrive.

Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue herself never sees them—not until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks directly to her.

His name is Gansey, and Blue soon discovers that he is a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.

But Blue is drawn to Gansey, in a way she can’t entirely explain. He has it all—family money, good looks, devoted friends—but he’s looking for much more than that. He is on a quest that has encompassed three other Raven Boys: Adam, the scholarship student who resents all the privilege around him; Ronan, the fierce soul who ranges from anger to despair; and Noah, the taciturn watcher of the four, who notices many things but says very little.

For as long as she can remember, Blue has been warned that she will cause her true love to die. She never thought this would be a problem. But now, as her life becomes caught up in the strange and sinister world of the Raven Boys, she’s not so sure anymore.

From Maggie Stiefvater, the bestselling and acclaimed author of the Shiver trilogy and The Scorpio Races, comes a spellbinding new series where the inevitability of death and the nature of love lead us to a place we’ve never been before.

Continue reading

The Bad Beginning Review

Synopsis: Dear Reader,

I’m sorry to say that the book you are holding in your hands is extremely unpleasant. It tells an unhappy tale about three very unlucky children. Even though they are charming and clever, the Baudelaire siblings lead lives filled with misery and woe. From the very first page of this book when the children are at the beach and receive terrible news, continuing on through the entire story, disaster lurks at their heels. One might say they are magnets for misfortune.
In this short book alone, the three youngsters encounter a greedy and repulsive villain, itchy clothing, a disastrous fire, a plot to steal their fortune, and cold porridge for breakfast.

It is my sad duty to write down these unpleasant tales, but there is nothing stopping you from putting this book down at once and reading something happy, if you prefer that sort of thing.

With all due respect,
Lemony Snicket

Continue reading